Tag Archives: diabetes

PHM Is The New Black Post At CCA Blog With Diabetes Examples

This is a partial copy (teaser) of a guest blog I did on the Care Continuum Alliance blog earlier this week.

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With all the talk about Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) and Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs), the adoption curve for the Care Continuum Alliance (CCA) model for Population Health Management (PHM) should move beyond the innovators in 2013 and begin to “Cross the Chasm.” I believe there are several preconditions that would set the stage for this to occur, for instance:

  1. Technology advances leading to the “Big Data” focus;
  2. The changing paradigm from fee-for-service to outcomes-based care;
  3. The realization of the role of the consumer led by the e-Patient movement, the idea of the Quantified Self, and the focus of large healthcare enterprises on being consumer centric; and
  4. The budget crisis that is driving employers and other payers to embrace PHM, wellness, and other initiatives that impact cost and productivity.

Of course, most companies are still in the infancy of designing systems to address this coordinated care model, which does not view the patient as a claim, but longitudinally aggregates demographical, psychosocial and claims data.  Additionally, training staff using Motivational Interviewing and integrating external staff into the virtual care team in partnership with the provider will continue to evolve as do our care delivery models.

To read more especially the diabetes examples that I shared, please click over to their blog.  Thanks.

 

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Diabetes Innovation – mHealth; Quantified Self; Business Model

I’m not a diabetic, but I’ve been researching the topic to understand the space and what innovation is occurring around diabetes. This is a space where there are lots of applications, tools, devices, communities, and research. The ADA estimates the total US cost at $218B with very high prevalence. If you expand that on a global scale, the costs and impact is staggering.

  • Total: 25.8 million children and adults in the United States—8.3% of the population—have diabetes.
  • Diagnosed: 18.8 million people
  • Undiagnosed: 7.0 million people
  • Prediabetes: 79 million people*
  • New Cases: 1.9 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older in 2010.

So, what’s being done about it? And, what opportunities exist? I think you’ve certainly seen a lot of innovation events being sponsored by pharma and others.

You’ve seen a shift from drug to engagement for a few years as evidenced in this old post about Roche – http://www.diabetesmine.com/2009/10/a-visit-to-the-roche-new-concept-incubator.html

You’ve seen a proliferation of diabetes apps. (A prime opportunity for Happtique.)

From my traditional PBM/Pharmacy focus, you’ve seen several efforts there:

Obviously, Medco (pre-Express Scripts acquisition) thought enough of this space to buy Liberty Medical.

I pulled some screen shots and examples into a deck that I posted on SlideShare. I’d welcome people’s thoughts on what’s missing or what are the key pain points from a diabetes perspective (e.g., not integrated devices).

While I was doing my research, I found a few interesting things worth sharing.

Several interesting studies:

Some good slide decks:

Additionally a few videos:

I also posted some diabetes infographics on my blog – https://georgevanantwerp.com/2012/12/13/more-diabetes-infographics/

And, while I started to pull together a list of diabetes twitter accounts below, you can follow @AskManny’s list with 360 people already tagged in it. https://twitter.com/askmanny/diabetes

My starting twitter List:

1/3rd Of Diabetes Develop Chronic Kidney Disease #WorldDiabetesDay

With 347M diabetics worldwide and another 79M in the US alone with pre-diabetes, we hear a lot about this condition, and its cost impact. But, I’m always surprised that there’s not more focus on the fact that 1/3rd of diabetics will develop Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). CKD is a progressive condition for most patients where they eventually end up on dialysis which is very expensive and has a significant impact on patient’s quality of life.

So what can diabetics do to avoid developing CKD:

  • Control your blood sugar level
  • Keep blood pressure under control
  • Check your blood pressure as often as your doctor recommends
  • Ask your doctor to test you for kidney disease at least once each year
  • Take medicines to help control your blood glucose, cholesterol, and blood pressure if your doctor orders them for you
  • Follow your diet for diabetes
  • Get regular exercise
  • Avoid alcohol
  • Do not smoke
  • See your doctor as often as you are told

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