Tag Archives: #CX

Dynamic Journey Mapping and P2P

I’ve talked several times about what P2P (peer-to-peer) healthcare is.  We have examples of PatientsLikeMe and CureTogether.  This is something that Pew has talked about several times over the years.  Additionally, here’s a blog post by Susannah Fox on this.  The point is that people turn to Dr. Google and social media often before they talk to a healthcare professional.  That’s critical to understand. 

Interestingly, as I was reading the IMS whitepaper on Journey Mapping, it really got me thinking about how all this social listening and patient content can influence and shape the Patient Journey (see example).  We’ve already heard about the influence this channel is having on clinical trials.  And, we know that Big Data trends are driving lots of new data sources for analysis and insights.  I think this JAMA list is a good starting point.  But, as Jane Sarasohn-Kahn points out, we can’t forget about the Open Notes initiative and the power that it will bring with it. 

The question of course is how this will all be reflected in the way we think about the consumer in all the “patient experience” and “consumer engagement” hype in healthcare.  For example, this image from a Deloitte whitepaper shows some of the ways a health plan can influence the consumer experience.

Consumer Experience Payer

We all know this is tricky, and it’s critical to establish trust between the consumer and the entity influencing the journey.  Health plans and pharmaceutical companies are usually not high on the trust scale. 

That being said, the IMS whitepaper does a good job of pointing out the need to expand beyond the traditional effort of focusing on key influencers.  It’s important to understand the payer view and the patient view in new ways.  It’s also important to understand what matters to each group.  While adherence may seem like the right metric, I would argue that it’s simply the easy metric.  It’s important to really understand the overall health of the patient.  They care about their experience.  They care about their quality of life.  These all need to be factored into the patient journey

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AIS Quote Of The Day – Will Healthcare Ever Be Like Nordstrom’s?

I was reading my AIS Health Business Daily e-mail this morning.  Today’s quote of the day is below.  It made me wonder.  Think about any healthcare organization.  We have a long way to go to get here.

“The other part … of a great customer experience is to have a seamless interaction. The last thing we want to hear is ‘oh, I can’t help you, that’s his department’ or ‘I can’t help you, it’s his operating division’ or ‘I can’t help you because Sally helped you with that; I’m Sue.’ That’s not going to work. A great customer experience is when it is seamless. Customers look at us as a brand, as Nordstrom, as one. However we’re organized with our people, how we operate, customers don’t care about that. They care about what you stand for and the seamless customer experience.”

— Mike Koppel, Executive Vice President and CFO at Nordstrom Inc., speaking recently at America’s Health Insurance Plans’ Institute 2014 in Seattle.

The Case For Beyond The Pill Strategies In Pharma

You’ll hear this buzzword – “beyond the pill” – come up every once in a while in a discussion with a pharmaceutical manufacturer.  As the drug pipeline has dried up and generics have become the norm for oral solid medications, the question is how do these behemoth companies “pivot” to leverage their massive global footprints, their feet on the street, their deep disease specific insights, and their medications. 

“In population health, what once drove revenue becomes a source of cost. If products, services, and therapeutics don’t lower costs, meaningfully improve outcomes, and help better patient experience, population health managers simply won’t use them.” Jerry Cacciotti, Partner, Health & Life Sciences, Oliver Wyman (source)

I’m a big believer in this strategy.  Imagine what they could do in terms of services to wrap around obesity drugs.  Imagine how they could support patients with diabetes or with cancer.  While the short-term view is that these actions might help differentiate them from a formulary or specialty pharmacy perspective, I would argue that they might actually come out with new business models like Merck is doing with Vree Health.

Ultimately, it all begins with an understanding of several issues from the outside-in:

  • What is the patient journey?
    • How do they experience the healthcare system? (e.g., clinics, MDs, pharmacists, family)
    • How or what influences their experience? (e.g., Dr. Google)
    • How do their experiences change over time? (e.g., newly diagnosed versus chronically sick)
    • Which experiences do they remember? (or as one of my clients call it – the Golden Moments)
  • What does the patient really want or need?  (think about Maslow’s hierarchy of needs)
  • Where is the patient (especially from a digital perspective)?
  • What are the patient’s expectations for you (pharma) or another entity?
    • How do they feel about you?
    • Do they trust you?
  • How do the other constituents in the care team interact with you?  With the patient?
  • How do you create a culture of empowerment, consumer focus, and transparency to really understand the needs of different constituents, react to them internally, and embrace issues dynamically?

In this consumer experience space, I often look to Bruce Temkin’s work and research.  He does a great job at a cross-industry perspective.  In healthcare, I’ve been very motivated by the work of Ingrid Lindbergh who was at Cigna and then moved to Prime Therapeutics.  She’s my role model for what I want to do in a large healthcare company. 

Two things got me thinking about this topic.  First, I was struck this weekend that there was research showing that people who struggle to buy food for their families are non-adherent.  I really hope that anyone in this field wasn’t surprised by that fact.  Of course, the struggle is that everyone working in the field is often constrained by their view of the world which often doesn’t include much experience with poverty. 

Second, I was sent a new research piece by Accenture called “Great Expectations: Why Pharma Companies Can’t Ignore Patient Services”.  It made me think about Dennis Urbaniak’s move from Sanofi where he was leading a lot of innovation to a Managing Director at Accenture.  Perhaps, he will bring some of this type of innovative thinking to more pharma companies. 

Here’s two infographics from the Accenture report which I think help hammer home the point of why beyond the pill is necessary:

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The EveryMove 100 Ranks Health Insurance Companies…On Engagement and Empowerment

Engagement is such an essential part of healthcare.  I’ve talked about that many times and feel very passionate about how important engagement is to changing behavior and empowering consumers.  
 
I hadn’t had time to look at it when it first came out, but I finally got a chance to click on the press release from EveryMove which is a Sandbox and Blues sponsored company focused on health rewards and incentives.  
 
They put out the list of the top 100 health insurance companies in the US based on how well they engage and empower consumers – EveryMove 100 Health Insurance Index™ (https://everymove.org/everymove-100). In theory, if you could buy from any plan in any state in the exchange, this would be really helpful in selecting a plan.  Of course, as a researcher, I’d love to see some of the core data from a similar group of consumers to show how their engagement varied as they moved from one plan to another.  
 
They look at over 50 data points including:
  • mobile-friendly websites
  • mobile apps and app store rankings
  • self-service tools
  • incentive program offerings
  • community involvement
  • commitment to social engagement
  • consumer satisfaction
 The Top 10 include:
1.     Cigna 
2.     Kaiser Permanente of California 
3.     Premera Blue Cross 
4.     Humana 
5.     Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield 
6.     Independence Blue Cross 
7.     Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina 
8.     Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois 
9.     CareFirst 
10.   BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee
 
The bottom 10 (of the top 100) include:
90. Fidelis Care
91. Highmark BCBS
92. BCBS of VT
93. BCBS of ND
94. Rocky Mountain Health Plans
95. Concordia Plan Services
96. Molina Healthcare
97. PacificSource Health Plans
98. AvMed Health Plans
99. Vantage Health Plan
100. Lovelace Health Plan
 
Since Cigna was the first company in the payer space (that I know of) to have a Chief Experience Officer, perhaps this shouldn’t be a big surprise that they rank so highly here.  

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